FLOOR MARKING GUIDELINE : FLOOR MARKING


FLOOR MARKING GUIDELINE : FLOORING WALNUT : VICTORIAN HOME FLOOR PLANS.



Floor Marking Guideline





floor marking guideline







    guideline
  • road map: a detailed plan or explanation to guide you in setting standards or determining a course of action; "the president said he had a road map for normalizing relations with Vietnam"

  • a light line that is used in lettering to help align the letters

  • guidepost: a rule or principle that provides guidance to appropriate behavior

  • A general rule, principle, or piece of advice











floor marking guideline - Brady ToughStripe




Brady ToughStripe 104376 100' Length, 4" Width, B-514 Polyester, Orange Color Floor Marking Tape


Brady ToughStripe 104376 100' Length, 4" Width, B-514 Polyester, Orange Color Floor Marking Tape



Made with the most durable floor marking tape, ToughStripe floor marking tape is a long-lasting, heavy-duty solution for marking floors, aisles, work cells and other designated areas throughout your facility. Superior durability, withstand forklift traffic without tearing or lifting, low-profile design minimizes tears and scratches from skids, pallet jacks, etc., made with rugged polyester and aggressive adhesive. Easy application, can be easily applied by one person working alone, stiff polyester floor tape with liner prevents tape stretching and reduces wrinkles and wavy, uneven lines, no special floor preparation required - just clean with common cleansers. Painless removal, does not chip and flake when being removed - comes off in one piece, clean removal without any unsightly adhesive residue or damage to the floor. High visibility, high-gloss surface shines like new paint, low profile minimizes debris build-up along the edges that occurs with thicker (extruded) floor tapes, surface resists marks and smudges and cleans up like new, available in a variety of high-impact colors. Brady B-514 exhibits a dry slip index of 1.0 when tested using an English XL Variable Incidence Tribometer per ASTM / ANSI F1679. B-514 exceeds safety standards for clean, dry non-slip surfaces per ANSI A1264.2-2006 and OSHA 1910.22. Continuous roll shape. Permanent rubber based adhesive. Not recommended for outdoor use. RoHS Compliant/Lead Free.










76% (10)





New York Public Library, Tompkins Square Branch




New York Public Library, Tompkins Square Branch





Alphabet City, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

Summary

Opened on December 1, 1904, the Tompkins Square Branch of The New York Public Library is one of the earliest Carnegie branch libraries in New York City. It is one of twenty in Manhattan and one of sixty-seven in New York City, built when Andrew Carnegie donated $5.2 million in 1901 to establish a city-wide branch library system. The preeminent and nationally influential architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White designed the Tompkins Square Branch and twelve other Carnegie branch libraries. The library, with its characteristic vertical plan and arched entrance offset to one side, classically-inspired style and carved stone ornament, and tall, arched first and second floor windows providing abundant lighting to a simple interior, is characteristic of the urban Carnegie library type. The library has played a prominent role in the neighborhood for nearly one hundred years.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

History of the Tompkins Square Neighborhood

The Tompkins Square neighborhood is located on the Lower East Side, centered around Tompkins Square Park. The area, part of the farm of Peter Stuyvesant in the seventeenth and eighteenth century, was known as Stuyvesant Meadows. St, Mark's in the Bowery Church, the burial place of Peter Stuyvesant and (1799-1854, a designated New York City landmark) was built on the high, dry land east of Second Avenue. The land to the east was marshy and sparsely developed at that time. In the early nineteenth century the area from the East River to Second Avenue was the estate of Daniel D. Tompkins (1774-1825), governor of New York and vice president of the United States under President James Monroe.

The Commissioner's Plan of 1811, which established the city's grid system, created Tompkins Square as well as nearby Union, Stuyvesant, and Madison Squares. The square, located between 7th and 10th Streets and Avenues A and B, was the site of a farmers' market in 1812. Originally known as Clinton Square, it was named for Daniel D. Tompkins in 1833 and the following year it was leveled, planted, and fenced by the city in an effort to encourage development in the area. Additional planting and paving was undertaken in the 1860s and 1870s.

Tompkins Square has been the site of major public demonstrations and a nexus of civil disobedience since its opening. The Astor Place Opera House Riot spilled over into the square in 1849, and it was the site of conflict between Tammany Hall Democrats and Whigs that same year. Anti-municipal-government activity converged on the square in the 1850s and, after the financial Panic of 1857, a series of 'work and bread' rallies were held in the square by the American Workers League. In that same year, George Templeton Strong wrote in his diary of the case of the death of a German immigrant leader in a riot uptown. Strong stated that, depending on the verdict, there could be a "grand insurrection and a provisional government proclaimed in Tompkins Square."

During the Civil War, wives of soldiers demonstrated in the park to protest a wartime cut in public relief. In 1874, after the financial Crash of 1873, hundreds were injured and arrested in a workers' demonstration for jobs and unemployment benefits. More than a hundred years later in 1988 a demonstration against a curfew also turned into a major disturbance. Both the 1874 and the 1988 events were called the Tompkins Square riot.

The Tompkins Square neighborhood was populated by workers and middle class shop owners in the first half of the nineteenth century and the area was known for its German community throughout the nineteenth century. In 1904 over one thousand people, many of them German residents of the neighborhood, died in the burning of the General Slocum, an excursion steamboat. A monument to the victims stands in Tompkins Square Park. Many of the remaining German residents moved out of the area after this tragedy, replaced by Italian, Eastern European, Russian, and Jewish immigrants. In the mid-twentieth century Latin-American immigrants moved into the area.

The neighborhood was one of the most densely populated in the world. The nineteenth and early twentieth century masonry row houses and the tenements, built for the masses of immigrants who arrived in New York, still line the streets. The remaining late-nineteenth, early-twentieth century Greek Orthodox churches, Catholic churches, and Jewish synagogues evoke the diversity of the area. First Houses (1935-36, a designated New York City landmark) just four blocks south of the square, was the country's earliest public, low-income housing project.

The neighborhood, now considered part of the East Village, became the locale for outdoor rock concerts and hippie gatherings in the 1960s. Artists moved into the area beginning in the 1960s. From the 1970s there has been a turnover from the old immigrant population to a new professional population.

History of Manh











rem koolhaas




rem koolhaas





New York Times
November 4, 1994


ARCHITECTURE REVIEW

Rem Koolhaas's New York State of Mind

By HERBERT MUSCHAMP

EW YORK CITY'S most inspiring architect lives in London, works in Rotterdam and has yet to build a thing on the North American continent. But for the next three months, Rem Koolhaas has the stage at the Museum of Modern Art, where New Yorkers can see for themselves how their city continues to shape the world even as their own architecture has slipped below world-class standards. Considering all the fanfare this show has generated, including lavish spreads in the fashion glossies, "O.M.A. at MOMA: Rem Koolhaas and the Place of Public Architecture" turns out to be relatively modest in scale. Confined to one top- floor gallery in the Modern's department of architecture and design, the show presents models and drawings for five projects designed in the last five years by Mr. Koolhaas and his Office for Metropolitan Architecture (O.M.A.). Three additional models, depicting urban plans, are displayed on the landing outside.
(Models for three private houses are on view in the museum's Education Center on the ground floor.)

But anticipation for this show, which was first scheduled to open more than a year ago, has been mounting for some time. And the hoopla is not incidental to the work on view. This is a show about buildings and cities, but it is also a show about aura: the aura of the city, the role buildings play in creating that aura and the glamour that occasionally surrounds an architect of promise, leading excitable critics to plunge recklessly overboard with extravagant words of praise.

Mr. Koolhaas, who was born in the Netherlands in 1944 and educated at the Architectural Association in London, first achieved public attention with the 1978 publication of his book "Delirious New York," an ecstatic love poem to Manhattan that challenged conventional thinking in urban design. While planners and urban designers struggled to bring logic, sanity and order to the built environment, Mr. Koolhaas argued that the glory of the city lies in the exceptional, the excessive, the extreme. A champion of what he called "the culture of congestion," Mr. Koolhaas viewed the Manhattan skyline as a kind of euphoric party, as if architecture had been squeezed vertically not by real- estate values but by the eagerness of people to get together on a small island and laugh it up.

Since that colorful debut, Mr. Koolhaas has accumulated an impressive body of built work, including apartment buildings in the Netherlands and Japan, the Netherlands Dance Theater in the Hague and the Kunsthal, an art exhibition center in Rotterdam. He has also pushed the limits of architecture with provocative designs for projects that so far remain unbuilt, like the Jussieu Library in Paris. But the achievement that has established him most solidly on the international map is Mr. Koolhaas's master plan for Euralille, a commercial project now nearing completion in northern France. Designed to exploit Lille's position as a major hub for Europe's high-speed trains, Euralille includes buildings by the architects Christian de Portzamparc and Jean Nouvel, in addition to a trade and convention center designed by Mr. Koolhaas.

These projects, too, display Mr. Koolhaas's enduring passion for New York: the glass-curtain-wall skyscrapers pioneered by Mies van der Rohe; the bustling street life of places like Times Square, where peril and pleasure jostle each other in a synergistic mix. But Mr. Koolhaas's most highly burnished New York touchstone is the work of the architect Wallace K. Harrison. Harrison, the subject of a show organized by Mr. Koolhaas in 1980 at the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in Manhattan, designed such fabled New York landmarks as the United Nations Headquarters, the Trylon and Perisphere at the 1939 New York World's Fair, and the Hall of Science at the 1964-65 World's Fair. For Mr. Koolhaas, these projects represent the ideal of an architecture at once modern and romantic; they defined an urban mythology for changing times.

Organized by Terence Riley, chief curator of the Modern's architecture and design department, the Koolhaas show was at one point scheduled to run concurrently with last season's mammoth show on Frank Lloyd Wright. The two would have made an illuminating pair, for Mr. Koolhaas's vision of the city is nearly the antithesis of Wright's. Wright, at the threshold of the automobile age, championed the centrifugal city, dispersed into the suburban landscape by the car, the highway and the romantic ideal of individual autonomy. Mr. Koolhaas stands, by contrast, for the centripetal city: for the urban center that, at the end of the century, continues to act as a cultural magnet and an incubator for ideas. Mr. Koolhaas's designs for archetypal urban institutions - - two libraries, a museum, a school, a marketplace -- are the core of the Modern's show.

On a certain level,









floor marking guideline








floor marking guideline




Brady ToughStripe 104319 100' Length, 2" Width, B-514 Polyester Floor Marking Tape, Legend Black And White Diagonal Stripes






Made with the most durable floor marking tape, ToughStripe floor marking tape is a long-lasting, heavy-duty solution for marking floors, aisles, work cells and other designated areas throughout your facility. Superior durability, withstand forklift traffic without tearing or lifting, low-profile design minimizes tears and scratches from skids, pallet jacks, etc., made with rugged polyester and aggressive adhesive. Easy application, can be easily applied by one person working alone, stiff polyester floor tape with liner prevents tape stretching and reduces wrinkles and wavy, uneven lines, no special floor preparation required - just clean with common cleansers. Painless removal, does not chip and flake when being removed - comes off in one piece, clean removal without any unsightly adhesive residue or damage to the floor. High visibility, high-gloss surface shines like new paint, low profile minimizes debris build-up along the edges that occurs with thicker (extruded) floor tapes, surface resists marks and smudges and cleans up like new, available in a variety of high-impact colors. Brady B-514 exhibits a dry slip index of 1.0 when tested using an English XL Variable Incidence Tribometer per ASTM / ANSI F1679. B-514 exceeds safety standards for clean, dry non-slip surfaces per ANSI A1264.2-2006 and OSHA 1910.22. Continuous roll shape, stripes style. Permanent rubber based adhesive. Not recommended for outdoor use. RoHS Compliant/Lead Free.










Similar posts:

floor jack aluminum

remove sheet vinyl flooring

raised floor tile

floor tray

industrial floor plans

average cost to install hardwood floors

natural stone tile flooring



tag : floor marking guideline wood flooring reclaimed paint for garage floors

Comments

Private comment